More on the asymmetry that rules India’s business insolvency process

Since October last year, Scroll has been (intermittently) reporting on how India’s insolvency proceedings are coming along. Cumulatively, these reports flag a couple of peculiar patterns.

A lot of companies are up for sale — In a country with 7500 companies with a topline over Rs 250 crore, 2511 companies are slated for insolvency proceedings. There are very few buyers. Ergo, companies are changing hands at very low rates, creating in effect a giant fire-sale of Indian companies. This asymmetry between buyers and sellers is interesting. Even as most debt-saddled companies find themselves in insolvency courts, others (a very small set) continue on an acquisition spree.

An example here is Adani Enterprises. One of the most debt-saddled companies in the country, it continues to acquire companies and announce new projects with gusto. One answer why lies in today’s report.

Do please take a look.

Will India’s recent coal block auctions actually burden banks and skew the fuel market?

The first part of Scroll’s analysis of the coal block auctions took a close look at the auctions for the steel, cement and aluminium sectors. It found an extremely wide divergence in the winning bids. Some blocks went for twice the notified price of coal, or the price at which the bulk of India’s coal is sold, while others fetched a quarter of it. A similar divergence is also visible in the auctions of coal blocks for the power sector. Here, the concern is over the viability of the some of the bids. In a report published on March 16, which analysed the second round of auctions for the power sector, stock brokerage firm HDFC Securities said, “We believe there is a high probability of end use plants becoming unviable, even after factoring in merchant sales.”

the second part of our two-part story on the ongoing coalblock auctions. See previous post.

Are the coal block auctions as successful as the Modi government claims?

At a gathering in Paris last month, drawing attention to the coal block auctions that have taken place under his government, Prime Minister Narendra Modi boasted, “Twenty coal blocks out of 204 have been auctioned so far and we got more than Rs. 2 lakh crore from them.” The factual error in the statement – 31 blocks, not 20, have been auctioned in two rounds – might be the least of the problems with the government’s triumphal sentiment.

To start with, as a report in Business Standard explains, the Rs 200,000 crore is not a one-time payment flowing into government coffers, but revenues that are likely to accrue over the lifetime of the mines. These revenues include royalties that states would have earned regardless of whether the mines had been allotted or auctioned.

While auctions are an improvement over the discretionary allotments of the past, and the government has shown swiftness in moving ahead with them, what isn’t well understood is that the design of the auctions has a significant impact on their transparency and outcomes. Competitive auctions are meant to provide a market-based mechanism to discover the value of a resource. But poor design could impede price discovery.

As the government prepares for a third round of auctions, Scroll in a two-part series, takes a closer look at the first two rounds. Our analysis raises worrying questions about both the design of the auctions and their outcomes.

Ambiguous drafting continues to dog the NDA’s coalblock auction plans

an iffy clause in India’s new coal bill

the coal bill was passed by the lok sabha yesterday. it now goes to the rajya sabha. the auctions will start soon. and i am waiting to see how fair the auctions are. and whether oligarchs again manage to corner the damn blocks.

india’s coal boom and attendant air quality fears…