how to engineer a riot and influence people

Last Thursday, a mob nearly killed two Muslims in Uttar Pradesh’s Karhal town.
The two men, 55-year-old Mohammad Shafiq and 27-year-old Mohammad Kalam, were skinning a cow when they were accused of slaughtering the animal. Very rapidly, a mob of 1,000-1,500 people, according to police estimates, converged on the spot, a stretch of open land next to a small irrigation canal just beyond a predominantly Hindu basti.
Shafiq and Kalam, who work as butchers, were stripped and beaten. A police party that attempted to control the crowd was roughed up as well. Three of its vehicles – a jeep, a Bolero and a motorcycle – were burnt. After the police succeeded in rescuing Shafiq and Kalam, the mob loaded the cow onto a cart and paraded it through Karhal.
Along the way, it looted the vegetable market, ransacked and torched shops belonging to Muslims, and burnt an effigy of Samajwadi Party leader Azam Khan.

As such, the event raised several questions. Why would a hitherto peaceful town see such violence? Why were people claiming the cow — certifiably dead when it was wheeled away — had been killed? Why did all this happen on a day the local police station was bound to be deserted?

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Meat unit equity: Company filings show why BJP’s Sangeet Som should quit politics (like he promised)

On Friday, the Hindustan Times reported that Sangeet Singh Som, the Bharatiya Janata Party member of Uttar Pradesh legislative assembly from Sardhana, along with two others, had acquired land for a meat-processing plant in Aligarh. The report said that land for the company Al Dua Food Processing Private Limited was purchased by Som, who happened to be one of its three directors, along with Moinuddin Qureshi and Yogesh Rawat…
…Som, who had visited Bishara village in Dadri tehsil earlier this month and said the UP government was shielding cow killers, responded to the newspaper’s questions and “admitted that he had purchased the land a few years ago but claimed that he was unaware of being appointed as a director of the company”.

And so it started. Som went on to tell the Hindustan Times that as a hindu hardliner, he would never get into such a trade. And that he would quit politics if any link was established between him and the meat co. Well, like this story out today shows, there are links aplenty.